An organization of family historians, some with Toronto roots, others who live in Toronto, we have ancestors around the world.

Ontario Census: Online Lecture Series

When:
November 17, 2021 @ 7:30 pm
2021-11-17T19:30:00-05:00
2021-11-17T19:45:00-05:00
Where:
FOUR-SESSION ONLINE SERIES
Cost:
$25 / $20 for OGS members
Ontario Census: Online Lecture Series @ FOUR-SESSION ONLINE SERIES | Toronto | Ontario | Canada

Four-session online series:
7:30 pm to about 9:00 pm
November 17, 18, 24 and 25, 2021
$20 OGS members / $25 non-members

This four-session series will take a detailed look at census records for Ontario. We’ll look at why and how the records were created, how the process changed over the years—and how those factors impact on the ways we search for our families. We’ll go way beyond the quick snapshot of a household to find rich information about community and location. And if your ancestors were too early or seem to be missing from the census, there will be tips to help you find them—or understand why they’re not included.

Each session, including discussion, will be recorded and archived for a limited time, but for the most benefit, please try to participate in the live Zoom session. The series is now underway, but you may still register (until November 25) and view the recorded sessions you have missed. Click here to register!


November 17: Ontario Census Fundamentals
The census is one of the first records most genealogists discover, but we don’t always know what we don’t know. Starting with the 1851/2 census, this session will cover all the little details you might have missed: dates of enumeration, enumerators’ instructions, common enumerators’ practices, explicit and implicit information, abbreviations, quirks of each census year, non-population schedules, missing districts, strategies for finding people when the search engine doesn’t work, what’s where and why.

Speaker: Janice Nickerson is a professional genealogist based in Toronto. Her expertise includes Upper Canadian history, criminal justice records, turning bare bones genealogies into shareable family stories, and using genealogy gifts and games to create a legacy. Visit Janice’s website: uppercanadagenealogy.com


November 18: Locating a Property Using the Census
Census records can be used for more than just finding the names, ages, birth places, and occupations of our ancestors. Starting with the 1851/2 census this session will walk through the different processes for searching the surviving census schedules to locate where our ancestors lived in Ontario. Depending on the enumerator and what they recorded we might be able to find the exact address of a property and even locate it on a modern day map.

Speaker: Ken McKinlay, Ottawa, has been researching his family tree for over 20 years and discoveries are still being made. He has given talks for several branches of OGS, BIFHSGO, and the Ottawa Public Library. Ken shares the methodologies that he uses in his own research on his blog familytreeknots.blogspot.com


November 24: Census and the Community
Our ancestors did not live in isolation; they belonged to communities. Learning about our ancestors’ communities can help us understand them better, identify new sources of information and provide the evidence you need to be sure you have the right people. This session will show you how to use the census to learn more about your ancestors’ neighbours and community and how to use information you already have about your ancestors’ community to help you find your ancestors.

Speaker: Janice Nickerson is a professional genealogist based in Toronto. Her expertise includes Upper Canadian history, criminal justice records, turning bare bones genealogies into shareable family stories, and using genealogy gifts and games to create a legacy. Visit Janice’s website: uppercanadagenealogy.com


November 25: Early Census and Similar Lists
This session will look at census returns and census substitutes prior to the 1851/2 census of Canada West. While earlier returns are not comprehensive or easy to use, we’ll look at the best places to view the images and tips to decipher them. We’ll also look at an assortment of lists created by various levels of government and institutions to document inhabitants. The session will help you think creatively about what type of lists might exist for your ancestors and where you may find them.

Speaker: Jane E. MacNamara, Toronto, is the author of Inheritance in Ontario: Wills and other Records for Family Historians (OGS/Dundurn) and writes about genealogy at wherethestorytakesme.ca. A long time member of OGS, Jane lectures about research methodology, Ontario, and English family history to genealogical and historical groups throughout southern Ontario. She teaches courses for Toronto Branch OGS, most notably hands-on courses about Ontario records.