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Vimy Cross fragment brought home for a Parkdale boy

Mark a stone, but let me lie
With my fellows who fought and died
With me on Vimy Ridge

Roy Jones, remembered on memorials at Parkdale Public School and Parkdale CI.

Roy Jones, remembered on memorials at Parkdale Public School & Parkdale CI.

Parkdale’s Roy Victor Jones was one of some 3,600 Canadians who died at Vimy Ridge. A wooden cross marked the spot where he fell on April 9, 1917.

Roy’s parents had their son’s cross brought home when the Great War’s “crosses row on row” were replaced with stone markers. (Temporary markers not claimed by families were burned—the ashes scattered at the ceremony during the 1936 pilgrimage to Vimy attended by more than 6,000 Canadians.)

Thus, a fragment of a Vimy cross still stands in Park Lawn Cemetery, Etobicoke.

John Wesley Jones and Helen Elizabeth (Moreland) Jones were later buried near their son’s Vimy cross. The verse on their shared grave stone speaks for their son.

Lieutenant Roy Victor Jones, 22 years old, remains with his comrades in Canadian Cemetery No. 2, Pas de Calais, France, about one kilometre south of the Vimy memorial. Back home, his parents marked a stone and treasured his original cross as a reminder to all who walk by of his sacrifice—and theirs.

Detail of cross fragment.

The date Apr 9, 1917 still visible on the cross fragment.

Jones family stone with the Vimy cross fragment in front. (The parents are recorded on the reverse.)

Jones family stone with the Vimy cross fragment in front. (The parents are recorded on the reverse.)

3 comments to Vimy Cross fragment brought home for a Parkdale boy

  • Fran C

    My grandfather was a Sgt Major in WWI. One of his battles was Hill 145; where the Vimy monument now stands. I am so grateful he made it home as his son did not, and died just 9 days before the end of WWII. This is a wonderful project. Lest we ever forget the price paid by many for the freedoms we enjoy today.

  • Martha Jackson

    Thanks for telling us, Fran, that one of your grandfather’s battles was Hill 145—the highest point on the seven-kilometre-long Vimy Ridge. Hill 145 was so named because it stood 145 metres (476 feet) above sea level. The strategic importance of that elevation was the view it gave for tens of kilometres in all directions across the surrounding Douai Plain. The symbolic importance to Canadians is the part played by men such as your grandfather in the victory.

  • Thomas McCue

    I am Roy Victor Jone’s cousin (3 generations removed) and I visited his grave this past summer in St Vaast, Vimy Ridge. I’d love to know more outside of his service records which I have. It seems neither of his brothers had children though. I wonder what happened to letters, war penny and plaque….
    T McCue.

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