Earlier posts

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Elementary Schools: A to C

ADAM BECK / ALEXANDER MUIRALLENBY / ANNETTE STREET/ BALA AVENUEBALMY BEACHBEDFORD PARK / BIRCH CLIFF PUBLIC SCHOOLBLANTYRE AVENUE / BLYTHWOOD / BOWMORE ROAD / BROCK AVENUE / BRUCE / CARLETON VILLAGE / CLINTON STREET / COTTINGHAM STREET /

Adam Beck Public School  (ADM-PS)

Students at Adam Beck Public School (City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 204)

Location: 400 Scarborough Road, Toronto, Ontario  M4E 3M8 (west of Victoria Park Avenue; south of Gerrard Street East)

NOTE: There is another TDSB school with a similar name—Sir Adam Beck, 544 Horner Avenue, Toronto (Etobicoke) M8W 2C2

Opened: 1925

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWI: NA

Ward during WWII: Ward 8

Type of school: Elementary

WWII Memorial at Adam Beck Public School, Toronto (ADM-PSa)

History:
1925 Sept.3: School opened in two portables under principal Miss N.J. Yeo. Named after Sir Adam Beck, first chairman of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario.
1926 June 17: Cornerstone laid for permanent schoolhouse.
1927 Dec 16: School officially opened.

Memorials transcribed:
ADM-PS-a: (WWII): A.J. Casson “For King and Country/Members / of Adam Beck Public School / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces.” Four main columns of names inside borders; two short columns of names outside borders (one on the left side; one on the right side). Surnames followed by initial(s) except for women whose given names are in full; two teachers are listed as Mr. (no initial or given names) followed by surname.  Key: A gold hand-drawn cross, outlined in black indicates “Died or Killed in Action”; a silver hand-drawn five-point star indicates “Prisoner of War.” List does not specify which war, but date of school opening, presence of women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II. Lettering by Charles E. Challis.

Alexander Muir/Gladstone Avenue Junior & Senior Public School  (ALX-PS)

Location: 108 Gladstone Avenue, south of Dundas Street, Toronto, Ontario  M6J 3L2

Gladstone Avenue School in 1902, with teacher Miss Adda Burger and principal Alexander Muir for whom the school is now named (Toronto Public Library)

Opened: 1888

Alternate or former names: Gladstone Avenue School

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWI: Ward 6

Ward during WWII: Ward 6

Type of school: Elementary

History:
The original school on this site, named Gladstone Avenue School, opened June 1, 1888, and consisted of eight classrooms and two kindergartens. In 1925, a new three-storey building was erected and the name of the school changed to Alexander Muir in honour of the first principal, 1888–1906, and author of the patriotic song “The Maple Leaf.” (Forever). A senior school addition was erected in 1952, the cornerstone was laid on May 9, and the building was officially opened on April 7, 1954. Building operations for the latest senior school wing commenced November 1959, and the building was formally opened on June 7, 1961. The site was enlarged by the closing of Trafalgar Street.

Memorials transcribed:
ALX-PS-a (WWI): Framed under class: “Alexander Muir School Honor Roll”. Four columns with “Staff” written above the first and fourth columns. Two staff members are listed under each heading.  Surnames followed by given names. (Bottom of document: BOND-Toronto). Located beside library door.
Note: It is unusual to have a World War I memorial and no WWII memorial, but in 2008, no WWII memorial was found, nor was one seen when the project began in the 1980s. There are hangers on the wall near memorial (a), so perhaps a second memorial is “missing.”

Allenby Public School (ALL-PS)

Location: 391 St Clements Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5N 1M2 (north of Eglinton Avenue; west of Avenue Road)

Allenby Public School (City of Toronto Archives Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 205)

Opened: 1926

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWI: NA

Ward during WWII: Ward 3

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1926: small wooden one-room school built for 22 pupils from grades 1 to 8. Probably classes were taught in portables on this site beginning in November. By December, Lord Allenby, a British First World War hero, gave the Board permission to name the school after him.
1927 Jan: There were two wooden structures; total of 69 pupils.
1927 Nov 8: Cornerstone laid.
1928 Jan: Nine-room building opened with 311 pupils and eight teachers.
1929: Toronto continued to expand north; ten-room addition started.
1931 Mar 17: Official opening. Lord Allenby invited, but unable to attend; sent best wishes by telegram. A few months later, he granted the school permission to use his crest and his motto “Fide et Labore” (by Faith and Hard Work).
1933: Two additions; one at the south end included three classrooms and a swimming pool; one at north end had four classrooms and a general purpose room.
1946 Mar 5: In a letter displayed near the war memorial, the Toronto branch of the Junior Red Cross thanked Allenby students for their donation to the war effort, helping children of Europe and England. (The Kinsmen-sponsored “Milk for Britain” fund.) Allenby’s donation of $122.21 was the largest received from participating Toronto schools. Room 20 gave ten dollars.

Published history: Ritchie, Don. North Toronto. Boston Mills Press: Erin, ON., 1992. pp 130-133.

Web sites: http://schools.tdsb.on.ca/allenby/75thanniversary.htm

Memorials transcribed:
ALL-PS-a: (WWII): (illuminated list). [Union Jack, school crest, Ontario Ensign] Honour Roll / Allenby Public School / Former Students who served in the Armed Forces During World War II (1939 – 1945). Five columns. Surnames followed by given names and initials. Key: A red asterisk indicates “Missing, killed or died on Active Service”. These names are grouped in column iii.

Annette Street Public School (ANN-PS)

Location: 265 Annette Street at Clendenan Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M6P 1R3

WW1 Memorial at Annette Street Public School for teacher Harry Erland Lee. © Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch

Opened: 1886 Completed in June; opened in the fall.

Alternate or former names: S.S. #22 York Township

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWI: Ward 7

Ward during WWII: Ward 7

Type of school: Elementary

History: The oldest public school in the West Toronto area. Decision to purchase school site made by trustees of School Section 22, York Township, in November 1885. A two-room red brick building was erected in 1886. In 1888, West Toronto Junction became an incorporated village; one year later, an incorporated town. In 1889, the school had six rooms; gradually enlarged to 12 rooms. In 1890, Annette became the County of York Model School, and so continued until the town withdrew from the jurisdiction of the county council. West Toronto became a city in 1908; one year later it was amalgamated with the City of Toronto. Soon after amalgamation, the old school was demolished. In 1911, the first unit of a new building was erected. The top two floors were added in 1912. The senior school wing was erected in 1960, when the existing building was renovated; formally opened on March 1, 1962.

Published history: Miles, Joan and Diana Fancher (editors). West Toronto Junction Revisited (writings of A.B. Rice), 4th edition. Toronto: West Toronto Historical Society, 1999.

Web sites: http://www.annettehpa.com/

Memorials transcribed:
ANN-PS-a-RIP: (WWI) Bronze memorial (with black background) to Gunner Harry Erland Lee, 16 Sept 1916, the first Toronto teacher to die in World War I.

ANN-PS-b: (WWII) A.J. Casson “For King and Country Members of Annette Street School who have volunteered for active service with Canada’s fighting forces.” There are six columns of names. List does not specify which war, but an A.J. Casson document and the presence of women’s names usually indicates World War II.

ANN-PS-b-RIP: (WWII) Centred, at the top of columns iii and iv, above two stylized olive branches, is an “In Memoriam” section, with 10 names on each of two lists.

Bala Avenue School (BAL-PS)

Location: 6 Bala Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M6M 2E1 (near southeast corner of Jane Street and Weston Road)

Opened: 1913

Alternate or former names: School Section No. 28 (Village of Mount Dennis; old community of Weston) York Township

Pre-1998 municipality: City of York

Ward during WWI: York Township

Ward during WWII: York Township

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1913: School built.
1929: Four classrooms added.
1959: Four more classrooms and gymnasium added.

Published history: Boylen, J.C. York Township, An historical summary. Municipal Corporation of the Township of York: York Township, 1954. p 128

Memorials transcribed:
BAL-PS-a: (WWII): Illuminated list; “Honour Roll” headed by five coloured flags; hand-printed; designer unknown; some water damage and aging. Four columns, with five names arranged at the top. Surnames followed by given names or initials.  Key: cross “Killed in action.” List does not specify which war, but presence of women’s names and mention of women’s divisions, indicate World War II.
NOTE: The list does not name the school, but was on site in June 2008.

Balmy Beach Public School (BLM-PS)

Location: 14 Pine Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4E 1L6 (west of Victoria Park Avenue; north of Queen Street East)

WW1 Memorial at Balmy Beach Public School. © Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch

Opened: 1906

Alternate or former names:
Pine Avenue School
Public School Section 6 (Village of East Toronto) York Township

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWI: Ward 1

Ward during WWII: Ward 8

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1906: Built by East Toronto Public School Board.
1907 Sept: School opened as a four-room, two-storey, brick schoolhouse, known as Pine Avenue School. Only the first five grades were enrolled at Balmy Beach School. Enrolment of 256 pupils.  The first principal was N. Jennie Yeo. The original teachers were, Elizabeth Lucas, Annie E. Walker and Minnie M. White.  .
1908 Oct 6: The name Balmy Beach school was first used at a school board meeting.
1908: Town of East Toronto annexed to the city of Toronto. The area changed from a resort to a residential community.
1914: Kindergarten introduced.
Increasing enrolment resulted in additions in 1910, 1911, 1914, 1921, 1928, and 1929, making a total of 21 rooms and 827 students.

Memorials transcribed:
BLM-PS-a: (WWI) Bronze plaque: Balmy Beach School/ Erected by the Home and School Club/ in commemoration of former pupils who,/ in defence of Canada and the Empire,/ served in the Great War, 1914 – 1918. Three columns. First names followed by surnames. At the top of column ii is the heading “Killed in Action.” First names followed by surnames. At the bottom: “Their name liveth for evermore.”

BLM-PS-b: (WWII) (illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson). “For King and Country/ Members of/ Balmy Beach Public School/ who have volunteered for active service/ with Canada’s fighting forces.” Six columns. Surnames followed by given names or initials. Key: A red hand-drawn cross indicates “Killed”; a red hand-drawn asterisk indicates “Missing.” List does not specify which war, but presence of World War I memorial, women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

Bedford Park School (BED-PS)

Location: 81 Ranleigh Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 1X2 (east of Yonge Street; north of Lawrence Avenue East)

Bedford Park School in 1920 (City of Toronto Archives Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 206)

Opened: 1911

Alternate or former names: See also: Blythwood and John Wanless schools

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWI: North Toronto

Ward during WWII: Ward 9

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1910 Apr 26: Purchase of site approved by North Toronto Public School Board.
1910 Nov. 3: Temporary accommodation rented in the Bedford Park Mission.
1911 Sept.: New building occupied; Forsey Page, architect.
1926 Sept.: When John Wanless Public School opened in two portables, the Bedford Park principal supervised the classes.
1927 Mar 1: When Blythwood Public School opened, the Bedford Park principal supervised its one-room portable.

Published history: Ritchie, Don. North Toronto. Boston Mills Press: Erin, ON., 1992. pp 130-133.

Web site: http://bedfordpark.wordpress.com

Memorials transcribed:
BLM-PS-a: (WWII) (illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson). “For King and Country / Members of / Bedford Park School, Toronto, Ont. / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces.” Eight columns. Surnames followed by initials. No key. List does not specify which war, but presence of women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

NOTE: No World War I list has been found. The school also has a plaque listing of teachers (13 names) “who died while on our staff or after superannuation” (1912-1960).

Birch Cliff Public School (BIR-PS)

Location: 1650 Kingston Road, Toronto, Ontario  M1N 1S2 (Northwest corner of Birch Cliff Avenue and Kingston Road; east of Warden Avenue)

WW2 Memorial at Birch Cliff Public School, © Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch

Opened: 1916

Alternate or former names: School Section No. 15, Township of Scarborough

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Scarborough

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1907: the first post office (in Arthur Mitchell’s store, Kingston Road and Birchmount) was named Birch Cliff. Many early homeowners were English, Irish, Scottish artisans and wage-earners who commuted daily (about six miles) to Toronto; some by green radial car (five-cent fare).
1916 Sept 5: School opened. Principal and only teacher, Mrs. E.E. Reece, had arrived in Canada the year before. Some students had previously attended Oakridge School. Completion of the 10 to 12 planned rooms was delayed because of WWI. (Architect’s drawing had appeared in July newspaper.) Only 45 senior students were able to attend. “Birch Cliff” (after the birch trees along the bluffs) was the name of an early settler’s home.
1916: Money raised for causes such as Belgian children, Red Cross, Royal Navy Home, and Consumptive Home.
1917 June: The only upper fourth (grade eight) pupil, Alex McCartney, passed his entrance exam to high school with honours.
1917 Sept: Four rooms completed. Further early teachers were Miss Bunner and Miss Wilson.
1918: Ratepayers presented a piano to the school.
1918 Oct: School closed for a time to check spread of influenza. No students or parents died.
1919: First four-room addition (Rooms 5, 6, 11 and 12). Previously the Kalmar Club (later a nursery school at Eastwood and Freeman) was used for classes.
1920 Feb 12: Home and School Association formed. From 1921 until 1944, they established a lending library in the school—adults only; children’s books added in 1925.
1921: Classes staggered to handle pupil-load.
1922: Rooms 1, 2, 7 and 8 added.
1920s (late): Pupils planted and harvested Morley’s Field (west of the school) to provide free lunches for those who stayed at noon.
1928: Enrolment reached 590. Four “temporary” portable classrooms set up in schoolyard; remained until 8-room addition completed 22 years later.
1935: Lorne Wideman (teacher; later principal) started hockey as a school sport. Games on the back rink when boys could find a puck and enough sticks.
1941 June: Mrs. E.E. Reece, principal, moved to Board of Education. W.J. Taylor, former teacher, became new principal.
1951 Mar 15: Eight-classroom addition.
1953: Gymnasium completed.
1955: Rooms 21-25 added.

Web sites: http://schools.tdsb.on.ca/birchcliff/about.html Includes much local history and school history taken from a Journal (recording years 1917- 1966) presented to the school by Henry S. Redman, Township Solicitor, December 31, 1917.

Memorials transcribed:
BIR-PS-a: (WWII) Illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson. “For King and Country / Members of / Birch Cliff Public School / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces.” Six columns. Surnames followed by given names. Key: A black-inked star indicates “Those who gave their lives in the Service of King and Country.” Near the bottom of column iv, names beginning with “a” to “h” start a new list. Column v is headed “Names added after March 1944” and includes “a” to “w” Only one name, John Burman, appears in column vi (high up). There is no explanation for this placement. Also in this column is a General Service badge. No World War I list has been found. List does not specify which war, but presence of women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

Blantyre Avenue Public School (BLN-PS)

Location: 290 Blantyre Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M1N 2S4 (East of Victoria Park Avenue; south of Gerrard Street East)

Detail of the WW2 War Memorial at Blantyre Avenue Public School. Note reference to Korea for Robert Miller. © Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch

Opened: 1928

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Scarborough

Ward during WWII: Scarborough Township

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1928: Opened.
1993: Original building replaced. Archway preserved on school grounds.

Memorials transcribed:
BLN-PS-a: (WWII & Korea) (illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson, noted as “AJC”). “For King and Country / Members of / Blantyre Ave. Public School / who have volunteered for active service / with Canada’s fighting forces.” Four columns. Surnames followed by given names. No key, but a silver stick-on star probably indicates death. One name (Robert Millar) has a hand-drawn star with “Korea” beside it. List does not specify which war, but date of school opening, presence of women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

Blythwood Public School (BLY-PS)

Location: 2 Strathgowan Crescent near Blythwood Road, Toronto, Ontario M4N 2Z5

Setting of the cornerstone for the new Blythwood School noted in The Globe, on April 28, 1932.

Opened: March 1, 1927

Alternate or former names: Lawrence Park School (until Feb. 19, 1931)

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWII: Ward 9

Type of school: Elementary

History: Opened as a one-room portable on the present site under the principal of Bedford Park P.S. on March 1, 1927. Corner stone laid April 27, 1932; new building occupied Oct. 3, 1932. Formal opening Oct. 28, 1932.

Published history:
Ritchie, Don. North Toronto. Boston Mills Press: Erin, ON., 1992. pp 130-133.

WW2 Memorial at Blythwood Public School (digital composite of portraits from BLY-PS-b and BLY-PS-c) © Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch

Memorials transcribed:
BLY-PS-a (WWII) A.J.Casson “For King and Country: Members of Blythwood School who have volunteered for active service with Canada’s fighting forces.” Four columns of names; surnames followed by given names. Red cross symbol is footnoted “Died on Active Service”. List does not specify which war, but the school was built after World War I.

BLY-PS-b (WWII) Vertical wooden frame of six photos with names printed underneath; no explanation, but photos match BLY-PS-a names (except for George Brockway), that have a red cross symbol indicating ”Died on Active Service”.

BLY-PS-c (WWII) Vertical wooden frame of six photos with names printed underneath; no explanation, but photos match BLY-PS-a names that have a red cross symbol indicating ”Died on Active Service”.

Bowmore Road Public School (BOW-PS)

Location: 80 Bowmore Road, Toronto, Ontario  M4L 3J2 (south of Danforth Avenue, north of Kingston Road; between Coxwell and Woodbine Avenues)

Bowmore Road Public School in about 1928 (City of Toronto Archives Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 208)

Opened: 1923 Sept

Alternate or former names: Fairmount Park Public School

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWII: Ward 8

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1922: Oct 24: Cornerstone laid.
1923: New building occupied
1964: Joined to Fairmount Park Public School.

Memorials transcribed:
BOW-PS-a: (WWII) A.J. Casson “For King and Country / Members of (sic) Teachers and Pupils of Bowmore Road Public Street School who have volunteered for active service with Canada’s fighting forces.” Four columns of names. Silver stick-on star indicates “Killed.” Although the key shows “Missing”and “Prisoner of War” designations, no symbols for these were visible on either list. Surnames followed by given names or initials. A – L (part). List does not specify which war, but date of school opening, presence of women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

BOW-PS-b: (WWII) A.J. Casson “For King and Country / Members of (sic) Teachers and Pupils of Bowmore Road Public Street School who have volunteered for active service with Canada’s fighting forces.” Four columns of names. Silver stick-on star indicates “Killed.” Although the key shows “Missing” and “Prisoner of War” designations, no symbols for these were visible on either list. Surnames followed by given names or initials. L (part)–Wright, followed by miscellaneous names. List does not specify which war, but date of school opening, presence of women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

BOW-PS-c: (WWII) Circular bronze plaque, coloured military and peace symbols. “Remember their deeds. / They shall not grow old.” No names.

Brock Avenue Public School (BRO-PS)

Brock Avenue Public School, Toronto (Robertson’s Landmarks of Toronto)

Location:93 Margueretta Street, Toronto, Ontario M6H 3S4 (north of College Street; west of Dufferin Street)

Opened: 1887

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1887: School opened. Margueretta Street runs parallel to nearby Brock Avenue, named for James Brock (d. 1833) a cousin of Sir Isaac Brock. James Brock owned land in the area. In 1850, his widow, Lucy, subdivided the land. A road allowance from the lakeshore to Bloor Street became known as Brockton Road; later changed to Brock Avenue. Presumably the school took its name from the street.  This was one of several Toronto schools where Alexander Muir, composer of “The Maple Leaf Forever,” taught.
1919: New school built.
1938: Addition.
1996: Rooftop garden built for hands-on ecological learning.

Memorials transcribed:
BRO-PS-a: (WWI): Illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson. “For King and Country / Members of / Brock Avenue Public School / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces / 1914-1918” Four columns. Surnames followed by given names. Key: A red inked cross indicates Killed in Action.”

War memorials at Brock Avenue Public School, Toronto

BRO-PS-b: (WWII): Illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson. “For King and Country / Members of / Brock Avenue Public School / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces / 1939-1945” Six columns. Surnames followed by given names. Key: A red inked cross indicates “Killed in Action.”

BRO-PS-c: Grey granite plaque (below old school bell with copper-coloured finish) Dedicated / 1914-1918 / to the pupils of / Brock Avenue Public School, / who gladly served in the Great War / pro rege et patria / Erected by the Old Boys executive of / 1933-1934 / (bottom corners) 1939 –1945.

Bruce Public School (BRU-PS)

Location: 51 Larchmount Avenue, Toronto, Ontario  M4N 2Y6 (South of Queen Street East; west of Leslie Street; South Riverdale area)

WW2 Memorial at Bruce Public School, Toronto (BRU-PS-a). © Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch

Opened: 1923

Alternate or former names: Leslie Gardens School

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWII: Ward 1

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1923 Dec: Opened as Leslie Gardens School with 389 pupils.
1924 Apr 3: School renamed Bruce Public School in honour of Edward Wesley Bruce, inspector of public schools.
NOTE: 1867 Oct.: Leslie Gardens inspired Alexander Muir’s patriotic song, “The Maple Leaf For Ever,” as follows: Muir and friend George Leslie (of Toronto Nurseries fame) were walking in Toronto near Leslie’s Gardens (near Queen St, east of the Don River; named after the Leslie family of Leslieville, a former suburb of Toronto). A falling maple leaf lodged on Leslie’s coat sleeve, despite efforts to brush it off. “There Muir! There’s your text! The maple leaf is the emblem of Canada! Build your poem on that,” Leslie is said to have exclaimed. Muir wrote the poem and sent it to Montreal a few hours later, as a last-minute entry in the Caledonian Society of Montreal’s patriotic poetry contest. It won second prize. The name Leslie Garden still exists as Leslie Garden Lane, Toronto.

Memorials transcribed:
BRU-PS-a: (WWII) Bronze plaque: “In proud / and loving memory of / Bruce School / who gave their lives for / freedom’s cause in / the Second Great War / 1939–1945.” Two columns. Given initials followed by surnames. “Their name liveth for evermore.”

BRU-PS-b: (WWII): Illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson. “For King and Country / Members of / Bruce Public School / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces.” Four main columns of names inside borders (all four columns continue below the key and the bottom border line); two short columns of names outside borders (one on the left side; one on the right side). Surnames followed by initial(s) except for women, whose given names are in full. Key: A red cross indicates “Killed or Died in Service”; a red circle indicates “Missing”; a red star indicates “Wounded”; red P.W. indicates “Prisoner of War.” List does not specify which war, but date of school opening, presence of women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

Carleton Village Public School (CAR-PS)

Location: 315 Osler Street, Toronto, Ontario  M6N 2Z4
NOTE: South building address is 2054 Davenport Road (East of Old Weston Road, between St. Clair Avenue and Davenport Road)

War Memorials at Carleton Village Public School, Toronto. © Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch

Opened: 1889

Alternate or former names: Carlton Public School, Carlton Street School, Davenport Road Public School, Davenport Road School (See also: General Mercer Public School)
NOTE: The spelling of Carleton Village, with or without an “e”, has been contentious since the 1850s. Even today, historical street markers spell Carleton without an “e,” while the local public school spells Carleton with an “e.”

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWI: Ward 7

Ward during WWII: Ward 7

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1889: A two-storey, eight-room brick school built by West Toronto Junction Public School Board.  Carleton Village (named after Sir Guy Carleton) amalgamated with the Town of West Toronto.
1909: The Village of Carlton was incorporated into the City of Toronto. The Toronto School Board gained jurisdiction over the school at the corner or Connoly and Osler Streets.
1914: Three-storey, 17-room, Carleton Public School was built on the northwest corner of Davenport Road and Osler Street, on an elevated site overlooking the intersection. It replaced an earlier building.  It is an example of an early 20th century educational building with features of Edwardian Classicism.
1919: Swimming pool was added.
1924 June: 313 pupils transferred from Davenport (Carlton) School to General Mercer Public School.
1931: Further additions.
1945: The Toronto Board renamed the school “Davenport Road School” because of a request from Old Davenport Road United Church.
1989: Following a merger with Osler Public School, the building at 2054 Davenport Road became known as the South Building of Carleton Village Public School.  It may be turned into a police station. Students now (2008) attend the north building, 315 Osler Street.

Published history: Ward 7 Schools, by W. Harold Male, 1947. p.17.

Memorials transcribed:
CAR-PS-a: (WWI) “For King and Country / Carlton School / Roll of Honour Canada.” Framed illuminated list; Three columns. Given names followed by surnames. Regular handwriting in ink. One handwritten star indicates “Wounded.” Two handwritten stars indicate “Died of Wounds or Killed in Action.” List does not specify which war, but the deaths match the names on CAR-PS-b, which specifies WWI.

CAR-PS-b: (WWI) Bronze plaque: “For God, For Truth, / For Liberty. / In Memory of / Former Pupils of Carlton School / Who Gave Their Lives in The Great War / 1914 – 1918.” Two columns. Given names followed by surnames.

CAR-PS-c: (WWII) Bronze plaque: “1939 Second Great War 1945 / The Torch You Threw to Us We Caught.” Two columns. Given names followed by surnames.

CAR-PS-d: (WWII) A.J. Casson “For King and Country / Members of Carlton Public School who have volunteered for active service with Canada’s fighting forces.” Gold cross appears to indicate death. Eight columns. Surnames followed by given names. A new alphabetical list begins in column seven. Thirty-two names appear below the border. There is no explanation for the placement of these two extra lists; presumably these names were added later. List does not specify which war, but presence of women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II. Also, the deaths match the names on CAR-PS-c, which specifies WWII.

Clinton Street School (CLN-PS)

Location: 460 Manning Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M6G 2V7

Clinton Street School in the 1920s (City of Toronto Archives Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 211)

Opened: September 1888

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWI: Ward 5

Ward during WWII: Ward 5

Type of school: Elementary

History:
Clinton Street, north of College Street, was the official location of the first Clinton Public School, built in 1887; opened in 1888 with 480 pupils as a two-storey, eight room brick building. In 1898, four rooms were added in a third storey. In 1913, a new three-storey, 17-room school was built on Manning Avenue, but the “old” school was retained. From 1913 to 1915, the old building housed the high school of commerce and finance, then again served public school students. In 1923, six more rooms were added to the 1913 building. In 1964, a completely new Clinton Public School (Junior) was proposed; cornerstone laid October 22, 1965; formal opening November 21, 1966.

Published history: Clinton Public School, 1888-1988. Toronto Board of Education, 1989.

Memorials transcribed:
CLN-PS-a: (WWII) “For King and Country” (illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson). One asterisk means “Killed”; two small asterisks mean “Missing”; a red arrow means “Decorated”. Surnames followed by given names. List does not specify which war, but presence of at least one woman, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, suggest World War II. A check of some of those “killed” reveals deaths in the 1940s

Cottingham Street School (COT-PS)

Location: 85 Birch Avenue, Toronto, Ontario  M4V 1E3

Certificate awarded by the Canadian Branch of the League of Empire to the students of Cottingham Street School, Toronto, for their efforts to supply hospital supplies during WW1. © Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch

Opened: 1878

Alternate or former names: Cottingham Public School

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWI: Ward 3

Ward during WWII: Ward 3

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1877: Two-room school built by the Yorkville P.S. Board adjacent to the present site.
1878: School opened. First principal, Miss B. Gillin, who served to 1891.
1883: Town of Yorkville annexed to the City of Toronto.
1888: Four-room addition.
1905: Two rooms and kindergarten added.
1956: Present building opened.

Published history:
Cottingham School, 1878-1950. 1950, 12p.
Hutcheson, Stephanie. Yorkville in Pictures 1853 to 1883: the early history of Yorkville. Toronto: Toronto Public Library Board, 1978.

Memorials transcribed:
COT-PS-a: (WWI) Framed document: Black and white circular photographs of Queen Mary and King George V, separated by the dates 1893–1918 and coloured crossed Union Jack and Red Ensign over Royal coat of arms: Presented to Cottingham School by the Canadian Branch of the League of the Empire in recognition of the work done by the pupils during May, 1918, in helping to provide over One hundred and Twenty Thousand Hospital supplies, valued at over Twenty Thousand Dollars, sent by the Schools in aid of the Army and Navy fighting in the Great War, and graciously accepted for distribution by Her Majesty Queen Mary on the occasion of Her Silver Wedding, July 6th, 1918. Crest: League of the Empire Founded in 1901. Signed: Maurice Hutton(?) President for Canada; James L. Hughes Vice-President for Canada; Emma Strathy Honorary Secretary for Canada; Florence M. Standish Honorary Secretary for Canada

COT-PS-b: (WWII) A.J. Casson “For King and Country Members of Cottingham Street School who have volunteered for active service with Canada’s fighting forces.” Six columns of names. Red cross indicates “Killed in Action”. Surnames followed by given names. List does not specify which war, but the use of an A.J. Casson document, presence of women’s names, indicates World War II.