Earlier posts

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Elementary Schools: K to M

KEW BEACH / KIMBERLEY STREETKING EDWARD / KING GEORGE / LAMBTON KINGSWAY / LAMBTON MILLS / LAMBTON PARK / LANSDOWNE / LESLIEVILLE / MCMURRICH / MIDLAND AVENUE / MORSE STREET

Kew Beach Public School (KEW-PS)

Location: 101 Kippendavie Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4L 3R3 (south of Queen Street East; east of Woodbine Avenue)

Primary students and teachers from Kew Beach Public School in 1910 (Toronto Reference Library, Baldwin Room, 967-20-1 small)

Opened: 1889

Pre-1998 municipality: Toronto

Ward during WWI: Ward 1

Ward during WWII: Ward 8

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1889 Dec 5: Miss E.A. Wray (later Holmes) appointed teacher to the temporary school to be opened in Kew Beach church. She was principal 1889–1904.
1889 Dec: School opened with 18 pupils.
1898 June 16: Board decided to purchase Kippendavie Avenue site for permanent schoolhouse.
1899 April: New building (three or four rooms) opened with 97 pupils.
1940: Fiftieth anniversary of school’s founding; first annual dinner of members of Kew Beach School Old Boys & Girls Association held.  Miss Wray Holmes’ service was commemorated on a scroll, dated 9 Feb 1940, listing 71 former students.
1963: New building.

Published history: Jansen, Pam and Mervyn Matier. Kew Beach School 100th Anniversary Reunion, May 27, 1989. Toronto: Toronto Board of Education, 1989.

Memorials transcribed:
KEW-PS-a: (WWI) (illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson). “For King and Country / Members of / Kew Beach School / who have volunteered for active service / with Canada’s fighting forces / 1914 [sword] 1918” Six columns. Surnames followed by given names or initials. No deaths indicated. The use of an A.J. Casson document is uncommon for World War I.

KEW-PS-b: (WWII) (illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson). “For King and Country / Members of / Kew Beach School / who have volunteered for active service / with Canada’s fighting forces / 1939 [sword] 1945” Six columns. Surnames followed by given names or initials. No key, but a silver stick-on star probably indicates death.

KEW-PS-c: (WWI & WWII) bronze bell: McNeely & Co., West Troy, N.Y., 1889. In Memory of / those who served / 1914–18 (space) 1939–45. Below the bell is a silver-coloured plaque: This bell was originally in the bell tower of the old school that stood on this site.  It was taken down from the bell tower in 1921, when additional rooms were being added and preserved for many years in the war memorial of the old school.  It was moved to this location in 1964 when the old school was demolished. [Supersign]

KEW-PS-d: (WWII) (illuminated list possibly designed by E. A. Lister). Kew Beach School Old Boys & Girls Association / Toronto, Ont / 1889–1939
Although this is a list of old boys and girls (71 names) made on the school’s 50thanniversary, one student is designated as “on active service.” List is dated 9 Feb 1940.

Kimberley Street School (KIM-PS)

Students and teachers pose in front of Mary Street School (later Kimberley Street School), Toronto, in 1889 (Courtesy Toronto Reference Library, Baldwin Room, x48-8 small)

Location: 50 Swanwick Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4E1Z5 (southeast corner of Main and Gerrard Streets)

Opened: 1882

Alternate or former names: Kimberley School; Kimberley Avenue School; School Section 6 (Village of East Toronto) York Township; Mary Street School; See also: Malvern Collegiate Institute

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWI: Ward 1

Ward during WWII: Ward 8

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1882: Four-room wooden or brick structure called Mary Street School opened, facing Kimberley Avenue (formerly Mary Street) north of present building. First principal was Mr. Craven.
1897: As the Grand Trunk Railway prospered, the village grew. Two-storey new building (four classrooms) was begun just south of the original structure. The office was at the front of the second floor. Two primary classrooms remained in the old building.
1903 Sept. 1: East Toronto High School opened in the original Mary Street School (now Kimberley Public School) when that school moved to a new building on the same site. Malvern had its beginning in two rooms of the original school.  F. W. French was principal; forty-two students.  Later, one room of the new building was also used.
1906 Jan.: High school pupils moved to their new four-roomed school on the site of the present Malvern Collegiate.
1906: Mary Street School believed to have been demolished.
1907: Although East Toronto had changed the name of Mary Street to Kimberley Street, the minutes of the East Toronto School Board for August 13 refer to “Mary Street School,” whereas those for November 3 refer to “the old school building on Kimberley Street”. Four classrooms added.
1908 Dec. 15: East Toronto Village annexed to Toronto. The high school became Malvern Collegiate. Mary Street School was renamed Kimberley.
1909 Jan: Enrolment 526 pupils.
1910: A kindergarten, manual training room, four more classrooms and a domestic science room on the third floor were added.
1913:  Kindergarten extended; two classrooms, one on either side of the domestic science room, added.
1922: Office, nurse’s room, dental office, teachers’ rooms, six outside classrooms completed.
1964: School built on new site, facing Swanwick Avenue. 1965 Sept. 7: First occupied by students.

Published history: Kimberley School, 1882-1957, (Toronto, 1957, 3pp).

Memorials transcribed:
KIM-PS-a: (WWII) “For King and Country” (illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson). Eight columns. Surnames followed by given names or initials. In the key: A cross indicates “Killed”; a circle indicates “Decorated”; a cross inside a circle indicates “Decorated & Killed.” P.O.W. appears in the left margin beside some names.  Memorial does not specify which war, but the presence of women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

NOTE: No World War I list has been found.

King Edward School (KGE-PS)

Location: 112 Lippincott Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2P1 (near the northeast corner of College and Bathurst Streets)

King Edward School (City of Toronto Archives Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 198)

Opened: 1901

Alternate or former names: Bathurst Street School (replaced by King Edward School)

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWI: Ward 4

Ward during WWII: Ward 4

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1872 Apr 29: Bathurst Street School opened at southwest corner of College and Bathurst Streets with accommodation for 300 pupils.
1900 Mar 1: Board decided to spend $4,500.00 for a “school site and twelve room building to replace the present Bathurst Street School and site”.
1900 Oct 4: Board decided on a two-storey building.
1901: Opened. Josiah J. Evans, who had been principal of Bathurst Street School 1899-1902, became the first principal, serving from 1902-1922.
1902 Sept 18: Board renamed school in honour of King Edward VII, who ascended throne that year.
1902 Oct 3: Formal opening of new school held.
1916: Annex for Home Economics and Manual Training added.
1921: Addition.
1956: Site enlarged for present school; original building demolished by the time new school opened.
1958 Nov. 24: Formal opening of new school.
NOTE: Notable former student and World War II veteran Stanley Grizzle became the first black officer for the Ontario Ministry of Labour in the early 1960s and was appointed a citizenship court judge in 1978. In 2007, “Stanley G. Grizzle Parkette” across from the Main Street subway station was dedicated.

Memorials transcribed:
KGE-PS-a: (WWI) Bronze plaque:  In loving memory / of the boys of / King Edward School / who gave their lives / for humanity / in the Great War, / 1914 – 1919. Two columns. Last name listed is centred at bottom. Given names and some initials followed by surnames. At the bottom: Their name liveth for evermore.

KGE-PS-b: (WWII): Illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson. “For King and Country / Members of / King Edward School / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces.” Six columns. Surnames followed by given names or initials.  Column iii has heading “Killed.” Surnames (6) followed by given names. Column iv has headings: “Killed.” Surnames (3) followed by given names; “Missing.” Surname (1) followed by given names;  List does not specify which war, but presence of a World War I memorial, women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

King George Public School (KGG-PS)

Plaque commemorating Victoria Cross awarded to Frederick J. Topham at King George Public School, Toronto. ©Toronto Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society

Location: 25 Rexford Road, Toronto, Ontario  M6S 2M2

Opened: 1911 (year of George V’s Coronation)

Alternate or former names:
Elizabeth Street School
S.S. No. 22 York Township (The 1882 cornerstone is displayed in the entrance way of King George Public School)

Pre-1998 municipality: City of York

Ward during WWI: Ward 3, York Township

Type of school: Elementary

War memorial (KGG-PS-a) at King George Public School, Toronto ©Toronto Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society

History:
Elizabeth Street School (built 1889 on southwest corner of Elizabeth and Louisa Streets) became too small to handle growing school population. Teacher Alma Brown recalled that in 1910 she had 90 pupils all day. Desks for just half of the students; others sat on the floor or around the raised platform at the front of the room; salary: $450 per year. Miss Brown retired from King George in June 1952.
1909: City of Toronto annexed West Toronto. Elizabeth Street became Runnymede Road; Louisa Street became St. John’s Road.
1911: School planned: name chosen to honour coronation of King George V. First principal: J.H. Beamish; remained until 1933.
1912: Two-storey, brick, six-room school built on St. John’s Road. As part of a City of York re-zoning plan, school would replace Elizabeth Street School, a couple of blocks away. Separate entrances for boys and girls; outhouses instead of washrooms; water pumped from well, as water mains not built until 1920. Talking in class forbidden. Disobedient students got the strap or stayed after class to write “lines” on the blackboard. Wooden desks joined together and bolted to the floor. Students used inkwells and pens. Coal-heated basement furnace.
1922: Daily register “Recording the Attendance of Pupils” (This was on display at the 2012 reunion.)
1923 May: Dr. D. Hindson, dentist, arranged with Lambton Mills Board of Education to examine the pupils at the school and established an office “in the village.” Later a dental clinic was established at King George School “by the four school boards.”
1926: Clinic opened in D.B. Hood School.
1929 Oct: Great Depression began to affect school and neighbourhood.
1933: Teachers asked to contribute 10 percent of reduced salaries back to the township for relief purposes.
1935: Local school boards consolidated.
1935-1945: During WWII, air raid drills practiced weekly.
1945 Mar 24: Plaque honouring graduate Frederick J. Topham’s receipt of Victoria Cross unveiled.
1945 Aug 8: Parade and civic reception in Toronto for Frederick Topham. One hundred members of 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion served as guard of honour.
1964: Old school demolished and collapsed into its own basement; buried under asphalt. New school built on existing playground; turned to face Rexford Road.
1945 Nov: Frederick Topham laid cornerstone for Sunnybrook Memorial Hospital, Toronto.
1953 Sept 16: Principal sent the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of seven King George students whose fathers died while serving in the Armed Services.
1974 May 31: V.C. winner Frederick George Topham died suddenly following an electrical accident. Buried in Sanctuary Park cemetery, Toronto.
1982: Student My-Huong Lam, a young Vietnamese girl who entered Canada in 1980, as one of the “boat people,” drew the winning design for the school-crest contest, using educational symbols and the school colours of red, white, and blue—as in the British flag.
1990-1991: Asphalt playground torn up and removed to be replaced by grass-covered field. Workers discovered the foundation and bricks of the original building just below the surface.
2004: King George students part of a fundraising effort by the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion to donate Frederick Topham’s Victoria Cross to the Canadian War Museum. The school received a replica Victoria Cross in appreciation.
1987: Letter of congratulations from Queen Elizabeth II on school’s 75th anniversary. (Framed; displayed at school.)
2012 April 28: 100th anniversary reunion. Thirteen page booklet of school, with some illustrations, prepared. Displays; decades rooms; cake; sealing of time capsule; quilt with a square painted by each student; ceremonies; speeches; presence of oldest (aged 93) former student who has had three generations of her family attend King George. School reports close to 170 students.

Published history: King George Public School 1912-2012: Celebrating one hundred years. Some information reprinted from 75th anniversary booklet.

Memorials transcribed:
KGG-PS-a: (WWI) Large framed memorial with 59 individual photographs. Eight rows with eight photos in most columns. Names written underneath (given names or initials, followed by surnames.) At the bottom of the memorial: They nobly gave their services in the Great War 1914 – 1919 / York Township S.S. No. 29 / Photo by A.A. Gray & Co. / Toronto. In the centre of the memorial is a photograph of a nursing sister, Miss Sadie Watt.

KGG-PS-b: (WWII) Illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson. “For King and Country / Members of / King George Public School / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces.” Four columns. First names followed by surnames. Key: Red cross indicates “Killed in Action”; red asterisk indicates “Prisoner of War”; red circle indicates “died of injuries.” List does not specify which war, but date of school opening, presence of a World War I memorial, women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

KGG-PS-c: (WWII) Illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson. “For King and Country / Members of / King George Public School / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces.” Four columns. First names followed by surnames. Key: Red cross indicates “Killed in Action”; red asterisk indicates “Prisoner of War; red circle indicates “died of injuries.” List does not specify which war, but date of school opening, presence of a World War I memorial, women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

NOTE: Both lists are alphabetical. There is no explanation why there are two separate memorials for World War II.

KGG-PS-d: (WWII) Framed copy of portrait of Cpl. Frederick George Topham; Victoria Cross replica; wording of the of citation for the Victoria Cross, as follows: Cpl. Frederick George Topham V.C. / CITATION REGARDING THE AWARD OF THE VICTORIA CROSS TO / CORPORAL TOPHAM, 1st CANADIAN PARACHUTE BN. / Frederick George Topham who was born in Toronto, Ontario, on 10 August / 1917, attended King George Public School and Runnymede High School. / Before joining the military he worked in the mines at Kirkland Lake. After / the war he was a Toronto Police officer and later worked at Toronto Hydro. / He died on 31 March 1974 and is buried in Toronto. / On 24th March 1945, Corporal Topham, a medical orderly, parachuted / with 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion onto a strongly defended area / east of the Rhine. At about 1100 hours, whilst treating casualties / sustained in the drop, a cry for help came from a wounded man in / the open. Two medical orderlies from a field ambulance went out to / this man in succession, but both were killed as they knelt beside the / casualty. Without hesitation and on his own initiative, Corporal / Topham went forward through intense fire to replace the orderlies / who had been killed before his eyes. As he worked on the wounded man / he was himself shot through the nose. In spite of severe / bleeding and intense pain, he never faltered in his task. Having / completed immediate first aid, he carried the wounded man steadily / and slowly back through continuous fire to the shelter of a wood. / During the next two hours Corporal Topham refused all offers of / medical help for his own wound. He worked most devotedly / throughout this period to bring in the wounded, showing complete / disregard for the heavy and accurate enemy fire. It was only when / all casualties had been cleared that he consented to his own wound / being treated. His immediate evacuation was ordered, but he / interceded so earnestly on his own behalf that he was eventually / allowed to return to duty. On his way back to his company he came / across a Bren gun carrier, which had received a direct hit. Enemy / mortar bombs were still dropping around, the carrier itself was / burning fiercely and its own mortar ammunition was exploding. An / experienced officer on the spot has warned all not to approach the / carrier. Corporal Topham, however, immediately went out alone in / spite of the blasting ammunition and enemy fire, and rescued the / three occupants of the carrier. He brought these men back across / the open, and although one died almost immediately afterwards, he / arranged for the evacuation of the other two, who undoubtedly owe / their lives to him. This N.C.O. showed sustained gallantry of the / highest order. For six hours, most of the time in great pain, he / performed a series of acts of outstanding bravery, and his / magnificent and selfless courage inspired all those who witnessed it. (The citation appeared in The London Gazette, 3rd August 1945.)

KGG-PS-e: (WWII) WORLD WAR II 1939 – 1945 / Unveiled April 2nd 1946 / To Commemorate the valour of / Corporal / Frederick G. Topham V.C. / (coat of arms) / For his gallant exploit / east of the Rhine in Germany / March 24th 1945 / Hon (? ) / A graduate of / King George / Public School / 1933.

Lambton Kingsway Public School

Location: 525 Prince Edward Drive North, Toronto (Etobicoke) Ontario M8X 2M6 See: Lambton Mills

Lambton Mills School (LAM-PS)

Location: First school—north side of Dundas Street West; west of Royal York Road at the foot of St. George’s Hill. Subsequent schools—southeast corner of Government Road and Lambton Road (now 525 Prince Edward Drive North); south of Dundas Street West; north of Bloor Street West.

Opened: 1845

War memorial at Lambton Mills Public School

War memorial at Lambton Mills Public School. ©Toronto Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society

Alternate or former names: Union School Sections No. 3 Etobicoke Township and No. 24 York Township; Lambton Kingsway Public School (from approximately 1951)

Pre-1998 municipalities: Etobicoke and York (The school was a “union” school from 1845 until 1916, when it became an Etobicoke school.)

Type of school: Elementary

History:
Etobicoke was part of the land transferred by the Mississauga First Nation to the British Crown in the Toronto Purchase of 1787. In 1795, the name Etobicoke—from Mississaugan for “place where the alders grow”—was established. Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe designated the area bounded by Dundas Street West on the north; Mimico Creek on the west; Berry Road on the south and Scarlett Road on the east as “The King’s Mill Reserve.” Within this area, a settlement, known as “Cooper’s” or Cooper’s Mills, began in 1807, when York innkeeper William Cooper purchased land and built large grist, saw, and woolen mills on both sides of the Humber River, close to Old Dundas Street. The road wound down the valley to the village.

Old Dundas Street still (2013) travels down the valley on both sides, but no longer crosses the river. (A current area resident recalls that as a child, her mother allowed her to cross “the low bridge” over the Humber, but not “the high bridge.” A plaque on the high bridge has the dates: 1928; 1973; 2009.) Two local small businesses on (the main) Dundas Street West use the early name “Cooper’s Mills.” Old Dundas Street has mostly modern houses and highrise buildings—with the exception of Lambton House inn—described presently.

The adoption of the name “Lambton Mills” commemorated the visit to the Canadas by John George Lambton, Lord Durham, to investigate the Rebellions of Upper and Lower Canada and prepare “the Durham Report” of 1839. The name also acknowledged the many mills along the Humber. From 1850 to 1915, Lambton Mills flourished more than nearby villages because of its water power.

In 1848, Canada’s only American-born Father of Confederation, W. P. Howland, opened Lambton House at what is now 4066 Old Dundas Street—just south of today’s Dundas Street West bridge, on the east side of the Humber River. It operated as a hotel and tavern for 140 years until vacated in 1988. It was a station on the stagecoach route on Southern Ontario’s main east-west highway and a social centre for the area. Until after the First World War, Lambton House was a popular destination for city residents who wanted a trip to “the country.” Toronto city directories of the early 1920s described Lambton Mills as four-and-one-half miles west of City Hall. “Take Dundas car to the end of line, thence Lambton car.”

During Hurricane Hazel (1954) the inn was a staging point for rescue efforts; footings of the bridge destroyed during the hurricane are still visible at the end of the old road. During its 1993 bicentennial, the City of York designated the building an historic site, and dedicated a plaque. Restoration began in 1991; exterior completed 1994; main floor interior in 1998; second floor interior in 2002; the front porch rebuilt in 2010. The village of Lambton Mills prospered until 1915, when fire destroyed most buildings. Lambton House, the sole brick building in the area, survived.

1844 Dec 24: Duncan Murchison donated land for a school.

1845: A large one-room brick school was built by Meade Creech on the north side of Dundas Street, west of Royal York Road, at the foot of St. George’s Hill. It was later partitioned to become Etobicoke’s first two-roomed school.

1850: Etobicoke incorporated. The eight school sections included Lambton Mills. All eight had a total of about 333 students; 214 could read and write; 13 were studying French; eight were studying Latin.

1875: The Credit Valley Railway was surveyed to pass within 200 feet of the schoolyard. Trustees purchased a new site from Christ Church (Anglican) Mimico, on the southeast corner of Government Road and Lambton Road (now Prince Edward Drive). The land had been part of the King’s Mill Reserve; was transferred to the church in 1835. First schoolmaster of the new red-brick, one-room school was Mr. Cummings.

ca. 1885: Miss Elsie Stonehouse hired to teach the younger children.

1916 Jan 1: Four-room school, built adjacent to the old school, opened. The union with York ceased. School population grew because of Robert Home Smith’s Kingsway Park development. The old school continued as a community hall until it was torn down to make space for two more classrooms and an auditorium for the new school.

1927: Etobicoke High School Board formed. Since 1921, Lambton Mills students could move on to continuation classes (Grades 9 and 10) at Islington School, but the nearest high schools—Weston, Humberside, and Mimico—were considerable distances away. Etobicoke High School (Etobicoke Collegiate Institute from 1948) opened in 1928.

1940: Kindergarten “sun room” added.

1944: First reference to the name Lambton Kingsway School appears in a teacher’s register.

1951: The last reference to the name Lambton Mills School appears in a teacher’s register. The exact date of the name change is not clear.

1990: In spite of seven additions over the years, the school was showing its age. Decision to rebuild. During construction, students attended Mimico Adult Centre (formerly Mimico High School) which now accommodates John English School).

1993 Jan 1: New school opened with 551 students.

NOTE: The Etobicoke Board of Education held its last meeting on December 10, 1997 in preparation for Etobicoke’s amalgamation with the City of Toronto. The 12 trustees’ terms of office had been extended one month—into December—to ease the move into the Toronto District School Board, which began January 1, 1998.

Published histories:
Given, Robert A. Etobicoke Remembered. Toronto, Ont.: Pro Familia Publishing, 2007. NOTE: Teenaged Robert Given’s mother was a member of the Lambton Mills Women’s Institute. He volunteered to type the group’s Tweedsmuir History, starting his lifelong interest in local history.

Heyes, Esther. Etobicoke: from furrow to borough. Etobicoke, Ont.: Borough of Etobicoke Civic Centre, c1974. 200 p.: ill.

Sauro, Silvio. A Celebration of Excellence: to Commemorate the 25th Anniversary of the Etobicoke and Lakeshore District Boards of Education 1967–1992: and the Dissolution of the Etobicoke Board of Education May, 1947–December, 1997. Etobicoke, Ont.: The Board of Education for the City of Etobicoke. rev. 2nd ed. 1997. 135 p. ill. Appendices. Appendix E: Chronology of Educational Developments in the School Sections. Appendix F: Important Dates in the Governance of Etobicoke Public Education.

Memorials transcribed:
LAM-PS-a (WWI) Bronze: 1914 (maple leaf insignia) 1919 / Honor and loving memory / to those who died / honor also and grateful tribute / to those who daring to die survived. / Killed in Action. Two columns (13 names). Remaining names (38) also in two columns. Bottom of plaque: Erected by the people of Lambton Mills. The memorial hangs in Lambton Kingsway Public School.

NOTE: LAM-PS-b (WWII): A memorial remembered by former teachers from Lambton Kingsway as existing in the school before 1993 could not be found for photographing and indexing during our “For King and Country” visits.

Lambton Park Public School (LPK-PS)

Location:50 Bernice Crescent, York, Ontario M6N 1W9 (north of Dundas Street West; east of Scarlett Road )

Opened:1916

Original site of Lambton Park Public School, above a store at 26 Scarlett Road, Toronto

Alternate or former names: School Section No. 33, York

Pre-1998 municipality: City of York

Type of school: Elementary

History:
John Scarlett (1777 -1865) was a pioneer merchant-miller in the south part of the Lambton area in the early 1800s. During the War of 1812 he was a dispatcher and post rider. In 1838, he built his house “Runnymede,” at what is now the north side of the intersection of Dundas Street and Runnymede Rd. He also established the Simcoe Chase Course (for horse racing) on a flat section of his property near the present Lambton Golf Course, north of St. Clair Avenue. Scarlett Road was later named after him.
1911-12: John Scarlett’s property was first subdivided, and became known as Lambton Park district from its proximity to the historic settlement of Lambton Mills.
1914 Nov 6: Lambton Park School Section No. 33 formed following a meeting of ratepayers, called for the purpose of authorizing such action. Original boundaries of this school section were: on the north, the Etobicoke boundary; on the west, the Humber River; on the south, the CPR tracks; and on the east, the concession road known as Jane Street. The section was originally known as Scarlett Plains, as all of this property was originally owned by John Scarlett. First board: A. Shaw, J. Ellis, and John Fokers.
1914/1915: First classes were in a room over a store at 26 Scarlett Road. Senior pupils went to George Syme School. The first teacher, Miss Campbell, taught above the store and was later in charge of the four-roomed school.
1915 Jun 10: At a ratepayers meeting, the trustees authorized to issue debentures totalling $12,000 to purchase a school site.
1915 Aug 26: Debentures issued for $17,000 to construct a four-roomed brick school building.
1916 Sept 1: Building formally opened. Enrolment 122.
1922 Jan 30: Community growth prompted issuing of debentures totalling $55,000 to add four more class rooms.
1923 Sept: C. Sproule appointed principal; remained such until his death in February 1930.
1924 Mar 1: C.G. Rennie-assistant principal.
1926: Expenditures were $14,788.89 (compared to $1,659.79 in 1914).
1930 Feb: C.G. Rennie succeeded C. Sproule as principal.
1933 Oct: An opportunity class under the direction of Miss F. Baker opened. (Closed in June 1937).
1938 Sept: J.W. Norman appointed principal. In 1940, entered the services as Sports director for the Y.M.C.A.
1939: Lambton Park children had a good view of the procession from Exhibition Place of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth on the royal visit to Canada.
1945 Nov: Mr. Wilcox became principal after four years’ service in the army. (The school reported an enlistment in the armed forces of 165.)
1946 Sept: Mr. Norman resumed his duties as principal.
1949: Enrolment 326.
1949-50: A kindergarten, and a combination auditorium and gymnasium added on the west; three classrooms on the east.
1950 Oct 20: Addition opened by C.B. Routley, of the Ontario Department of Education.
1993: Old building replaced. The new building incorporates some features of the old, such as the portico and the concrete school name.
NOTE: Much of the school’s history comes from a hand-written (later copied by typewriter) school log, still at the school (2011).

Published history:
Lambton Park Graduates’ banquet. Toronto, Ontario: Lambton Park School, 1943. 4 leaves.

War memorials at Lambton Park Public School. ©Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch

Memorials transcribed:
LPK-PS-a: (WWI) Bronze: 1914 In Memory 1918 / of / Our brave heroes / Who laid down their lives for the cause of / Humanity in the Great War / (decorative line). Two columns; 6 names in each column. At the bottom: Lest We Forget

LPK-PS-b: (WWII): Illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson. “For King and Country / Members of / Lambton Park Public School / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces.” Six columns. Surnames followed by given names or initials. Key: silver stick-on star indicates “Prisoner of War”; silver stick-on star (also) indicates “Killed in Action”; grey stick-on star indicates “Wounded.” List does not specify which war, but date of school opening, presence of World War I memorial, women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.
NOTE: In the key, the significance of stars symbols is not always clear, because colours are similar.

LPK-PS-c: (WWII): Illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson. “For King and Country / Members of / Lambton Park War Work Auxiliary / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces.” Six columns. Surnames followed by given names or initials. Key: silver stick-on star indicates “Prisoner of War”; silver stick-on star (also) indicates “Killed in Action”; grey stick-on star indicates “Wounded.” List does not specify which war, but date of school opening, presence of World War I memorial, women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

NOTE: A separate A.J. Casson document for “War Work Auxiliary” is unusual. To date (2011) this is the only one found in the Toronto public schools. No explanation. In the key, the significance of stars symbols is not always clear, because colours are similar.

Lansdowne School (LAN-PS)

Location: 33 Robert Street, Toronto, Ontario  M5S 2K2 (north of College Street; west of Spadina Avenue; on the western curve of Spadina Crescent)

Opened: 1888

Alternate or former names: Lord Lansdowne School

Pre-1998 municipality: Toronto

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1887 Feb 17: Board decided to purchase site.
1887 June 16: Board awarded contracts for “the erection of a twelve room school building on Spadina Crescent.”
1887 May 19: School named Lansdowne to honour the Marquis of Lansdowne, Governor-General of Canada from 1883-1888.
1888 Mar: School opened with 945 pupils enrolled. One later pupil was 1948 Academy Award-winning best supporting actor Walter Huston (1884-1950) who was born in Toronto and also attended Wellesley, Ryerson and Winchester schools. His award was for “The Treasure of the Sierra Madre.”
1889: Addition.
1901 Mar 25: Along with Phoebe, Palmerston, and Clinton schools, Lansdowne students attended Manual Training in a basement room in the NE corner of Ryerson School fitted with 20 benches, tool racks, etc. Classes taught by “Mr. Rostance from England,” paid for “by Sir Wm Macdonald of Montreal who has undertaken to support the classes in city schools for three years.” (This information comes from the school diary of Samuel McAllister, who taught for almost 50 years and was principal of Ryerson 1877–1906. All principals were required to keep a school diary at the time.
1909: Addition.
1913: Addition.
1914 Feb 23: Fire damage; partial rebuilding required.
1960: Board acquired property on Robert Street for a new senior school. Building began on March 1; cornerstone laid November 16.
1961 Dec 6: Official opening of the modernist, nine-sided, circular school with brightly-coloured panels and a freestanding multi-coloured exhaust stack; sometimes called “the crown school” because of its shape. (The round shape would allow for a more efficient use of space.) A Precambrian boulder, unearthed during excavation, assumed to have been carried from north of Parry Sound by a glacier approximately 12,000 years ago, is displayed in the school’s front yard. Original building on Spadina Crescent demolished.
1967 Mar 16: Name changed to Lord Lansdowne (to avoid confusion with another school, located on Lansdowne Avenue in Parkdale.)
1988: Celebration of 100th anniversary.

WWI memorial at Lansdowne School, Toronto. ©Toronto Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society

WWI memorial at Lansdowne School, Toronto. ©Toronto Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society

Memorials transcribed:
LAN-PS-a: (WWI) Two-toned bronze plaque. Headed: (numerals in red circle) 1914 Honour Roll of Former Pupils of Lansdowne School / who Served their Country During the Great War (numerals in red circle) 1918. Seven columns. Surnames followed by given names or initials; followed by rank. Top of col i: Nursing Sisters (four names listed underneath.); top of col vii: Nursing Sisters (three names listed underneath). Key: (under the main heading) asterisk indicating: Killed in Action or Died of Wounds.

LAN-PS-b: (WWII): A.J. Casson “For King and Country / Members / of Lansdowne School / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces.” Eight columns. Surnames followed by given names or initial. Key: asterisk in red ink indicates “Killed.” List does not specify which war, but the presence of a World War I memorial, at least one female name, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II. NOTE: It is difficult to distinguish between the calligrapher’s E and F when they stand alone as initials.

Leslieville Public School (LES-PS)

Location: 254 Leslie Street, Toronto, Ontario  M4M 3C9

War Memorials at Leslieville Public School, Toronto. ©2010 Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch

Opened: 1863 or earlier

Alternate or former names: Leslie Street School

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWI: Ward 1

Ward during WWII: Ward 1

Type of school: Elementary

History:
Robertson’s Landmarks of Toronto reports Alexander Muir as first principal of the Leslieville School (a one-room township school) from 1863–70. Exact location of the original school was in Leslieville village in a cottage on the northeast corner of Curzon and Queen Streets. Later a one-room rural school was built on the southwest corner of Leslie and Sproat.

A proud Leslie Street School team poses on November 17, 1917 (City of Toronto Archives Series 372, Subseries 52, Item 735)

1884: Leslieville annexed to Toronto.
1884 May: Leslie Street School first appears in the Toronto School Board’s records, with 84 pupils enrolled.
1889: The school had eight rooms; later expanded.

Published history: “Leslieville of yesteryear”: a study of the local community.Toronto: Leslie Street Public School, 1957.

Memorials transcribed:
NOTE: All four memorials are arranged on a large white display board headed: 1914-1918 In remembrance 1939-1945

LES-PS-a: (WWI) “1914-1919 Honour Roll Leslie Street School.” Illuminated list, bordered with swords, torches, flags and maple leaves. Three columns of names. Surnames followed by given names or initials; all in capitals letters. Appears to be typeset. Red star appears to indicate death.

LES-PS-b: (WWI) Bronze plaque: For our to-morrows these gave their to-day / 1914 – 1918 / In grateful and loving memory / of all Leslie Street School boys / who fought and died / in the world war. /  Erected by / the staff and pupils of the school. / January, 1921. (No names are listed).

LES-PS-c: (WWII) “For King and Country” (illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson). Four columns. Surnames followed by given names. Symbol indicating death is a stick-on silver star. Memorial does not specify which war, but the presence of women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II. Includes names from Abbot to Little. This memorial has some streaking under the glass, but is legible.

LES-PS-d: “For King and Country” (illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson). Four columns. Surnames followed by given names. Symbol indicating death is a stick-on silver star. Memorial does not specify which war, but the presence of women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II. Includes names from Lockhart to Wren.

McMurrich Public School (MCM-PS)

Location: 115 Winona Drive, Toronto, Ontario  M6G 3S8 (Note: this part of Winona Drive had been part of Ossington Avenue when the school was opened.)

McMurrich Public School in the 1920s (City of Toronto Archives Fonds 1257, Series 1057, Item 268)

Opened: 1912

Alternate or former names: Adjacent to Winona Drive Senior Public School

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Ward during WWI: Ward 5

Ward during WWII: Ward 5

Type of school: Elementary

History:
Opened Jan. 1912, with 293 pupils enrolled. Named for former chair of the Toronto School Board John McMurrich (1804–1883).

Published history: History of the McMurrich Public School District: a brief outline from pioneer times to the present. [Toronto]: The school, [1968].

Memorials transcribed:
NOTE: Both lists appear on one illuminated memorial designed by A.J. Casson.

MCM-PS-a: (WWI) Top part of first column. At the end of the list is the notation (1914 – 1918). Surnames followed by given names. Cross symbol appears to indicate death. (WWII) Eight columns. At the end of the list is the notation (1939 – 1945). Surnames followed by given names. Cross symbol appears to indicate death.

MCM-PS-b: Brass memorial to Ernest Jones: In Memory Of Ernest Jones / Killed At Regina Trench / On The Somme. / Nov. 19th 1916 / Faithful Unto Death. Insignia of the 80th Canadian Overseas Battalion, “Paratus” (Latin “Prepared”).  This plaque is on the east wall of the corridor that joins McMurrich P.S. and Winona Drive P.S.; the south side of the wing – i.e. the Winona side.

Midland Avenue School (MID-PS)

Location: 459 Midland Avenue, Scarborough, Ontario M1N 4A7 (north of Kingston Road; east of Midland Avenue)

WWII memorial at Midland Avenue School, Toronto, ©2011 Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch

Opened: 1923

Alternate or former names: S.S. No. 10, Scarborough, John A Leslie Public School

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Scarborough

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1847: Scarborough divided into school sections. Section 10 was in the southwest; first frame school built on the south side of Danforth Road, about a quarter mile west of Kennedy Road.
1870: Frame building (S.S. No. 10) replaced by a one-room brick building.
1900: New S.S. No. 10 built on Kennedy Road.
1923: Population growth meant a new school needed: Midland Avenue School built.
1950: Name changed (at the time of an addition) to honour John A. Leslie, who grew up on 70-acre family farm on the east side of Midland Avenue, between Kingston Road and St. Clair Avenue. Educated at old Kennedy Avenue School and Malvern Collegiate Institute, Toronto. (Scarborough had no high school until 1922.) Leslie began the first of three terms as school trustee in 1925; Scarborough councilor for five terms; served on Scarborough Collegiate Board, beginning 1934; involved in other municipal services. Elected Progressive Conservative M.P.P. for York East; defeated 1948.
2011: To-date, the school has had 5 additions.
NOTE: The school gives 1923 as its opening date. The above information includes some of the earlier education efforts in the area. Date of name change to John A Leslie Public School not yet found.

Published history:
John A. Leslie Public School 50th anniversary: Sunday May 6, 1:00-5:00 p.m. [1973]. Prepared by Mrs. Bert Kennedy, 1973. 6 leaves: port.

Memorials transcribed:
MID-PS-a: (WWII) A.J. Casson “For King and Country / Members of / Midland Ave. School / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces.” Four columns. Surnames followed by given names. At the end of column iv, three names added in different handwriting (after Young, James). After “Rouleau, Gaston,” a glued-on strip of brown paper covers one space (presumably a correction or removal). After “Moss, Edward,” a silver stick-on star has fallen off, but outline remains. (There is a loose star at the bottom of the glass.) Key: After the outline of a (missing) stick-on star: These Paid the Supreme Sacrifice. List does not specify which war, but the date of school opening, presence of women’s names, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

Morse Street Public School (MOR-PS)

Location: 180 Carlaw Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4M 2R9 (South of Queen Street East; between Broadview Avenue and Pape Avenue)

WWI memorial made from the old bell at Morse Street Public School, Toronto, ©2011 Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch

Opened: 1874

Alternate or former names: South Park Street School, Leslieville School, Willow Street School, Eastern Avenue School

Pre-1998 municipality: City of Toronto

Type of school: Elementary

History:
1873 Sept 17: Board began search for a school site “at or near Leslieville” for inhabitants in eastern portion of St. Lawrence ward. Many early Leslieville residents were market gardeners or workers employed at one of the area brickworks.
1874 Feb 18: Selected site “west of Messrs. Leslie & Sons Nursery” on the northeast corner of Eastern Avenue and Pape Avenue.
1874 Aug 24: The two-room school was first called South Park Street School, but was soon officially named Leslieville School. The school was also sometimes referred to as Willow Street School, because it was at Willow Street and Eastern Avenue.
1874 Oct: Leslieville School opened
1884: The school became part of the Toronto Board with the annexation of Leslieville village.
1884 Feb 7: Name changed to Eastern Avenue School—presumably to avoid confusion with Leslie Street School which was also annexed to Toronto the same year.
1884 May 15: A Morse Street site purchased for a four-room school to replace Eastern Avenue School.
1885 Nov 28: Eastern Avenue School and site sold by public auction.
1885 Dec: Eastern Avenue School appears for the last time in the Inspector’s monthly report with 122 pupils enrolled.
1886 Jan: Morse Street School listed for the first time with 222 pupils enrolled.
1889: Addition.
1895: Addition.
1909: Addition.
1914: Addition.
1931: Addition. The school grew to 17 classrooms, three kindergartens, a staff room, offices and a health room.
1971 Jan 27: New school formally opened.

Published history:
Architecture: [Morse Street Public School]. Toronto, Ont. : s.n., 197?. [35] leaves: ill., plans.

Short history of Morse Street School: seventy-five years 1874-1949, [compiled by S. Herbert]. Toronto, Ont.: The School, 1950. 20 p.: ill., ports.

Morse Street Public School. Toronto, Ont.: Min. of Education, P.E.O.P.L.E. Project, 1974. 35 leaves: ill., maps.  “This history has been compiled and written by a P.E.O.P.L.E. Project, sponsored by the Ministry of Education, in co-operation with the Toronto Board of Education, under Ontario Experience ’74, a program of the Youth Secretariat.”

Recollections: [Morse Street Public School]. Toronto, Ont.: s.n., 1974. [20] leaves: ill., maps, ports.

Memorials transcribed:
MOR-PS-a: (WWI) Bronze half-bell surmounts plaque inscribed as follows: [garland of maple leaves] In Memoriam / to the sacred memory of / Morse St. Old Boys / 1914 who fell in the great war 1919 / “They Gave Their All” / This memorial cast from the old school bell / erected by / Morse St. School Old Boys and Old Girls Assn’s / 1932. Lower right-hand side of plaque has a small plaque: McIntyre & Taylor Ltd. / Made in Canada. Inscription on top of the half-bell reads: McNeely (?) Bell Foundery (sic) / West Troy, N.Y. 1874.

MOR-PS-b: (WWII) Illuminated list designed by A.J. Casson. “For King and Country / Members of / Morse Street Public School / who have volunteered for active service / with / Canada’s fighting forces.” Six columns. Surnames followed by initials or abbreviations of given names. Column i is headed: Army. Column iv is headed: Air Force. Column v is headed: Staff (7 names). Column vi is headed: Navy. Under the Navy list is the heading: Army (one name only). No key. List does not specify which war, but presence of a World War I memorial, and the use of an A.J. Casson document, indicate World War II.

MOR-PS-c: (WWII) 1939 [Canadian coat of arms, with some colours] 1945 / To the sacred memory / of those who gave their lives / and in grateful remembrance / of those who served in the / second great World War.