An ongoing research project of the Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch

A widow leaves her mark on Toronto

Was the Toronto community of Brockton named for War of 1812 hero Sir Isaac Brock?

Well, no. As Stephen Otto tells us in a new article for the Simcoe’s Gentry project, it was named for Sir Isaac’s not-so-famous cousin James Brock who was granted Park Lot 30.

An officer with the 49th Regiment of Foot and private secretary . . . → Read More: A widow leaves her mark on Toronto

The Mysterious Joseph Dainty

Not much is known about Joseph Dainty, but he petitioned twice for land from Lt.-Gov. Simcoe. On July 10, 1793, he requested a lot in the new town being developed at Toronto as well as a 200-acre farm close by, and this request was granted three days later. A month later,  he made a specific request . . . → Read More: The Mysterious Joseph Dainty

Census Day 2011: Make your mark in history!

Census Day in Canada is Tuesday, May 10. Canadians will receive the information brochure in the mail this week. It provides instructions from Statistics Canada about completing the census online, and how to order a paper form over the telephone if you prefer.

Regardless of the method you choose, please remember to check the “YES” box for the . . . → Read More: Census Day 2011: Make your mark in history!

Warming up cold January nights… in 1799

Research for the Simcoe’s Gentry project has given us some intimate glimpses of what life was like in the early Town of York for the Park Lot owners.

For instance, we know from the diary of Alexander Macdonell (Collachie), that on January 2, 1799—“a fine, clear, cold day”—that he had both lunch and dinner in the officers’ . . . → Read More: Warming up cold January nights… in 1799

Simcoe’s Gentry: the Park Lots of Toronto

Have you ever wondered why so many east-west streets in downtown Toronto are crooked?  Did you realize that this is an artifact of the way the original land was first surveyed and granted to the original landowners in the area? Might you be related to an early family that settled in now-downtown Toronto?

Intersection of Dundas . . . → Read More: Simcoe’s Gentry: the Park Lots of Toronto