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Jan
14
Thu
Understanding Ontario Land Registry Records
Jan 14 @ 7:30 pm – Jan 28 @ 9:00 pm
Understanding Ontario Land Registry Records @ THREE-SESSION ONLINE COURSE | Toronto | Ontario | Canada

SOLD OUT!

This course is now full.  To be put on a waiting list for our next course please email us at torontocourses@ogs.on.ca

Three-session online course: January 14, 21 and 28, 2021
$30 OGS members / $35 non-members

Despite the recent closure of Land Registry Offices, Ontario land registry records are becoming more available than ever before—particularly for researchers at a distance. For those new to these records, words like lot, concession, plan, abstract index, and instrument can be confusing. But they are also crucial to locating a parcel of land and the records of ownership. This three-session course will focus on helping you understand how land is divided and identified in Ontario both historically and today.

The course will demonstrate sources to help you find your ancestor’s property description and then locate it on a map. We’ll also look at how you can use the property description to find the records of purchases and other transactions using OnLand.ca, FamilySearch.org, microfilmed records at the Archives of Ontario, and original records deposited at local archives. While Crown Land records and Land Titles will be covered briefly, the emphasis will be on Land Registry records.

There will be homework! Please plan on time between classes for a little online reading and to check out some suggested websites. Each session, including discussion, will be recorded and archived for a limited time, but for the most benefit, please try to participate in the live Zoom session.

Jane E. MacNamara, Toronto, is the author of Inheritance in Ontario: Wills and other Records for Family Historians (OGS/Dundurn) and writes about genealogy at wherethestorytakesme.ca. A long time member of OGS, Jane lectures about research methodology, Ontario, and English family history to genealogical and historical groups throughout southern Ontario. She teaches courses for Toronto Branch OGS, most notably hands-on courses about Ontario records.

Jan
25
Mon
Becoming a Genealogy N.I.N.J.A.
Jan 25 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Becoming a Genealogy N.I.N.J.A. @ WEBINAR | Toronto | Ontario | Canada
All genealogists have hit a brick wall at one point or another. For the new researcher this can be a painful and frustrating experience. Using sound genealogical research methodology is the first step in overcoming brick walls.
The lecture will introduce learners to the NINJA approach to doing genealogical research. NINJA is an acronym that stands for Needs, Investigation, Notation, Justification, and Assessment. This approach represents a fresh look at the Genealogical Proof Standard that is designed specifically to assist beginner and intermediate researchers with overcoming brick wall problems in their research faster than guess work or haphazard research. We’ll look at real-world examples to demonstrate how the presenter used the NINJA method to overcome brick walls in his own research.
Speaker: Daniel Earl is essentially a family man. His interest in genealogy was sparked at age 10 when he visited the grave of his great-grandfather with his own father which has led to a 25-year journey in family history. He has since taken his own five children to that same spot in hopes of inspiring interest in their own ancestors. He has a Masters degree in psychology and teaches at the collegiate level. He is a member of the Mid-Michigan Genealogical Society, President of the Michigan Chapter of the Hungarian Genealogical Society, helped found the Clinton County Michigan Genealogy group, and he is a member of the Genealogical Speakers Guild.
Feb
22
Mon
Using Evernote for Genealogy
Feb 22 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Are you afraid to close your browser for fear of losing something important? Ever filed something away carefully on your computer in a folder never to see it again? Is your desktop a mass of random documents you put there so you could find them again? Want a better way of handling the things you find?

Speaker Linda Yip uses a program so good you’d think it was made for genealogy. She’ll talk about the dos and don’ts of filing, and how Evernote has made her a better genealogist. She has been doing genealogy since the mid-90s and recently went pro. An ex-BigLaw executive legal assistant who’s seen and used every kind of filing style imaginable, Linda has developed techniques for using Evernote in genealogy that you might really enjoy.

Speaker: Linda Yip is a writer, a photographer, and a storyteller, as well as being a genealogist. Linda writes about her latest genealogy finds from tools to uncovered family stories on her blog Past-Presence.com. She’s an active member of the BC and SK genealogy societies and is also a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists. Her passions are the history of the Chinese in Canada, Force 136, her growing collection of 30K+ images, and keeping her finds organized! Most weekends you’ll find her curled up on the couch with her laptop, either researching or writing about genealogy.
Mar
17
Wed
Understanding Ontario’s Crown Land Records
Mar 17 @ 3:00 pm
Understanding Ontario's Crown Land Records @ THREE-SESSION ONLINE COURSE | Toronto | Ontario | Canada

Three-session online course:
3:00 pm to about 4:30 pm
March 17, 24 and 31, 2021
$30 OGS members / $35 non-members

This online course will focus on the process involved in acquiring (or attempting to acquire) land from the Crown in early Upper Canada, and the records that were generated. Understanding the process is key to navigating the complicated but wonderfully rich set of records. An astounding quantity of material from the late 18th and early 19th centuries has survived and is now available free online or on microfilm by interloan. We’ll look at several big indexes to collections at the Archives of Ontario and Library and Archives Canada, and digitized records on FamilySearch, Canadiana, and at LAC.

There will be homework! Please plan on time between classes for a little online reading and to check out some suggested websites. Each session, including discussion, will be recorded and archived for a limited time, but for the most benefit, please try to participate in the live Zoom session. Registration is now open. Space is limited. Register early to reserve your spot!


Jane E. MacNamara, Toronto, is the author of Inheritance in Ontario: Wills and other Records for Family Historians (OGS/Dundurn) and writes about genealogy at wherethestorytakesme.ca. A long time member of OGS, Jane lectures about research methodology, Ontario, and English family history to genealogical and historical groups throughout southern Ontario. She teaches courses for Toronto Branch OGS, most notably hands-on courses about Ontario records.

Mar
22
Mon
HMS Speedy: Tragedy and Mystery
Mar 22 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
HMS Speedy: Tragedy and Mystery @ WEBINAR | Toronto | Ontario | Canada

The presentation “HMS Speedy: Tragedy and Mystery” will outline the true Canadian history story of the British gunboat, HMS Speedy, that disappeared in a storm near Presqu’ile Point in October 1804, with the loss of all 20 souls on board. Why did the Speedy sail to begin with? Who were the people on board and what were their family connections? What were the political conditions that changed Captain Paxton from a good civil servant into a tragic hero? Then, the discussion moves to the modern day and deals with the search for the remains of the ship, focused around the efforts of Ed Burtt, a professional diver from Belleville who was certain he had found remains of the Speedy during underwater survey work off Presqu’ile Point in the early 1990s. Why is it still a mystery? So many questions—all to be answered in this engaging talk that is based on Dan Buchanan’s recent book “The Wreck of HMS Speedy: The Tragedy That Shook Upper Canada”.

Speaker Dan Buchanan is a genealogist and historian. Known as a local “history guy,” Dan is involved in many organizations and projects in the Brighton area related to history and heritage.