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It’s Census time. Are you saying “Yes”?

Tuesday May 10 is Census Day in Canada, and if your household hasn’t yet received a census notice, chances are it’s in the mail.

Most of us have just ten questions to answer. But one in four households, selected at random, is receiving the 36-page “long-form” version, with dozens of questions about each individual’s place of birth (and their parents’ places of birth), citizenship, ethnic ancestry, education, employment, means of transportation, dwelling-place, health conditions and more. It all adds up to hugely valuable data for government and community planners—but also for future generations of local and family historians.

Major Henry Joseph Woodside, Census Commissioner, Yukon, 1901.

Major Henry Joseph Woodside, Census Commissioner, Yukon, 1901. Library and Archives Canada/PA-016341.

Why are censuses so important to genealogists? They’re the closest thing we have to snapshots of our ancestors in time—documents that record not just one event but the circumstances of entire families and neighbourhoods. So far, census records for what is now Toronto are available free of charge online for 1842, 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891, 1901, 1911 and 1921. To find out what you can find out about your ancestors in Toronto censuses and how to access them, visit our census records page.

Researchers will get a chance to see the information in your 2016 census return 92 years from now… but only if you answer “Yes” to the final question, “Does this person agree to make his or her 2016 National Household Survey information available in 2108…?” Imagine how your 22nd century descendants will feel when they find you.

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Toronto Branch Meetings

Feb
25
Mon
7:30 pm Toronto’s Early Police Detectives
Toronto’s Early Police Detectives
Feb 25 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Speaker: Ellen Maki Visiting the haunts of felons and searching pawn shops for stolen goods were some of the duties of Toronto’s Victorian police detectives. Who were the policemen who became detectives, and was their[...]
Mar
25
Mon
7:30 pm The Bachelorette New France
The Bachelorette New France
Mar 25 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
The Bachelorette New France @ Lansing United Church | Toronto | Ontario | Canada
THE BACHELORETTE NEW FRANCE: Stories of Bigamy, Incest, Witchcraft and Murder Speakers: Dawn Kelly and Carol Ufford In 1630 New France was populated mainly by men. France recognized that there were threats to its economy[...]
Apr
29
Mon
7:30 pm Tracking an 18th Century Regiment
Tracking an 18th Century Regiment
Apr 29 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Tracking an 18th Century Regiment @ Lansing United Church | Toronto | Ontario | Canada
Speaker: Sam Allison Genealogists can benefit from the techniques and sources used to write history books. Driv’n by Fortune is about a Scots regiment that settled in Canada. The 78th Fraser’s Highlanders (1756–63) defeated the French on the Plains of Abraham,[...]

Courses starting & Workshops

Mar
7
Thu
4:00 pm Hands-On Early Ontario Land Records
Hands-On Early Ontario Land Records
Mar 7 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Hands-On Early Ontario Land Records @ Archives of Ontario | Toronto | Ontario | Canada
Course runs on three Thursdays: March 7, 14 and 21, 2019. Registration is now full. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list please send your email request  to courses@torontofamilyhistory.org Land records[...]

Other Events

Jun
21
Fri
all-day OGS Conference 2019
OGS Conference 2019
Jun 21 – Jun 23 all-day
OGS Conference 2019 @ London Convention Centre
The 2019 OGS Conference provides a great opportunity for family historians to attend stimulating workshops and lectures from engaging speakers from Canada and around the world, see what’s available in the genealogy Marketplace, catch up[...]

Did you know?

That Toronto Branch OGS has more than 600 members? That members get a discount on publications, and course and workshop registration fees?